Nonprofit web design tips and more from CEDC

Posts tagged wordpress

17 notes &

Reverie - A versatile HTML5 responsive WordPress framework based on ZURB's Foundation

thechangelog:

Whoa, that’s a mouthful, but very exciting.

Reverie Screenshot

For those of you who have embraced jekyll, Octopress (the WordPress alternative for hackers) or NestaCMS - Reverie may not be for you. But there are still tons MILLIONS of sites/blogs running on WordPress.

As of today’s date (02/10/2012) there are 71,176,074 WordPress sites in the world and WordPress.com hosts about half.

Let’s summarize:

Zhen has licensed the Reverie Framework under an MIT License, the same as Foundation and encourages developers and designers to keep the footer information (“powered by Reverie Framework”) to help spread the word, though it’s optional.

Source on GitHub - Homepage

(Source: thechangelog)

Filed under wordpress responsive responsive design theme theming webdesign framework

19 notes &


The 2011 Open Source CMS Market Share Report concludes that three  brands - Joomla!, WordPress, and Drupal - dominate today’s market. The  Report concludes that WordPress leads in brand strength and market share  after a strong year.
The Report follows the market share and brand strength indicators for  20 top systems, assessing each on a wide variety of measures. The study  focuses on identifying the market leaders, both in terms of rate of  adoption and mindshare.
While WordPress, Joomla! and Drupal lead the survey set across a wide  range of measures, the report also identifies other trends in this  year’s open source CMS market.

The 2011 Open Source CMS Market Share Report concludes that three brands - Joomla!, WordPress, and Drupal - dominate today’s market. The Report concludes that WordPress leads in brand strength and market share after a strong year.

The Report follows the market share and brand strength indicators for 20 top systems, assessing each on a wide variety of measures. The study focuses on identifying the market leaders, both in terms of rate of adoption and mindshare.

While WordPress, Joomla! and Drupal lead the survey set across a wide range of measures, the report also identifies other trends in this year’s open source CMS market.

Filed under joomla wordpress drupal cms content management system report

7 notes &

Here’s a free Wordpress theme with HTML5, CSS3, and responsive design elements built in — a very cool start, although it doesn’t look like it has the capability currently to scale images on the fly (at least on their demo site). This means that at the mobile level, you’re still downloading a full resolution image and then scaling in the browser, which uses a lot of unnecessary bandwidth and slows page load dramatically.

Here’s a free Wordpress theme with HTML5, CSS3, and responsive design elements built in — a very cool start, although it doesn’t look like it has the capability currently to scale images on the fly (at least on their demo site). This means that at the mobile level, you’re still downloading a full resolution image and then scaling in the browser, which uses a lot of unnecessary bandwidth and slows page load dramatically.

(Source: twitter.com)

Filed under css3 html5 responsive design theme wordpress open source

2 notes &


Fine-Tuning WordPress for SEO
While WordPress has top-notch SEO features out of the box, there a  handful of things you can enhance to achieve even better SEO.  The  following are some basic tips on how to fine-tune your WordPress site to  attain improved search engine results ranking.

Click through for in-depth instructions on the following (by Adam Heitzman, posted on Six Revisions):


Permalink Structure for URLs


Title Tags


Meta Tags


Use noindex Meta Tag for Duplicate Pages


Use HTML Headings Properly


Use an XML Sitemap

Fine-Tuning WordPress for SEO

While WordPress has top-notch SEO features out of the box, there a handful of things you can enhance to achieve even better SEO.  The following are some basic tips on how to fine-tune your WordPress site to attain improved search engine results ranking.

Click through for in-depth instructions on the following (by Adam Heitzman, posted on Six Revisions):

  • Permalink Structure for URLs

  • Title Tags

  • Meta Tags

  • Use noindex Meta Tag for Duplicate Pages

  • Use HTML Headings Properly

  • Use an XML Sitemap

Filed under SEO search engine optimization wordpress

2 notes &

Comparing Open Source Content Management Systems

Wordpress, Joomla, Drupal, PloneIdealware has updated their 2009 report as of Dec. 2010. As expected, the list hasn’t changed all that much in terms of ranking, but each system has released a major version since the earlier report. They still rank them as follows: Wordpress (for the simplest sites), then Joomla (for somewhat more complex sites), and then Drupal (for the most robust or flexible sites). Note that they also rank Plone, but I’m leaving it off below since the custom server requirement is a non-starter for most small non-profits.

Below are a few excerpts from the summary.

WordPress

WordPress is a great choice for fairly small (a few hundred pages or less), simply arranged websites. It’s the easiest system to install and understand, and is easy to maintain and update, putting site setup within reach of anyone with a sense of technical adventure… Updating and editing images and text is also quite straightforward, and multiple add-on modules are available.

However, WordPress doesn’t scale as intuitively as the other three systems to support complex sites…There is only limited support for differentiation of user roles, although plug-ins are available to support permissions based on section or type of content.

Joomla

Joomla is a solid utility player, good for a variety of different situations, and it’s relatively straightforward to install and set up. There’s a bit of a learning curve to understand how the menus, site structure and content work and interrelate, but once you’ve got it the system provides a strong infrastructure for straightforwardly creating useful site structures to support even very large sites. Add-on modules support a wide variety of functionalities, from directories to shopping carts to community features, providing a solid base for many different kinds of sites.

While Joomla supports more complex site structures than WordPress, it is not as flexible as Drupal or Plone. Each piece of content is typically associated with a single page. This makes the system more straightforward to understand, but can be cumbersome to update and limits very advanced structures (like structuring a site around a multifaceted taxonomy)…

Joomla’s latest release, version 1.6, adds robust permission features to allow people to add, edit or publish information based on site section, content type or more…

Drupal

Flexible and powerful, Drupal is a great choice for more complex sites. It supports a wide variety of site structures — with widely used add-ons, you can define very detailed rules as to what content should be displayed where, and build your own custom content types. It has particularly strong support for Web 2.0 and community functionality, including user-submitted content. It’s also easy for content administrators to find and update content — once you have installed a WYSIWYG editor to let them format the text, which does not come out of the box.

But Drupal’s power comes with complexities. Understanding what the system offers and how to configure it is more difficult than WordPress or Joomla. The administrative screens for configuring a site have a huge number of options and settings, making them harder to interpret. And the flexibility of the system means it’s important to think through the best way to accomplish what you want before diving in. Most people will want to hire a consultant familiar with Drupal to help them set up a site rather than trying to go it alone.

Drupal’s latest release, 7.0, includes a new administrative interface that makes administration and content editing more intuitive, and adds the ability to create custom content types without an add-on…

[Shameless plug, regarding the fact that “[m]ost people will want to hire a consultant familiar with Drupal to help them set up a site rather than trying to go it alone”… we are such a consultant (and we also work with Joomla). But we are a non-profit and we only work with non-profit and social justicey groups!]

Excerpts from the summary came from here and the full report is available here.

Filed under open source content management system cms Drupal drupal-7 joomla wordpress plone

1 note &


Whiteboard is one of the best Wordpress frameworks on the internet. Unlike many other “frameworks,” Whiteboard is truly just that: a framework.  In comparing Whiteboard to other frameworks available online, you’ll  notice that many are more like Wordpress themes than frameworks. They  contain large amounts of theme-specific structure and styling that is  time consuming to build off of or eradicate.
Whiteboard is different - Whiteboard is a true Wordpress framework…

Whiteboard is one of the best Wordpress frameworks on the internet. Unlike many other “frameworks,” Whiteboard is truly just that: a framework. In comparing Whiteboard to other frameworks available online, you’ll notice that many are more like Wordpress themes than frameworks. They contain large amounts of theme-specific structure and styling that is time consuming to build off of or eradicate.

Whiteboard is different - Whiteboard is a true Wordpress framework

Filed under Framework Wordpress open source

0 notes &

Foundations Choosing Open Source (Case study on the Annenberg Foundation)

An interesting case study on why the Annenberg Foundation chose an open source solution (Drupal in particular) for their website redesign.

Why Open Source?

John admitted to something of a bias against proprietary systems based on the Foundation’s experiences as well as his own personal history as a developer and vendor. Proprietary systems often don’t communicate well with each other and thus become their own silos. Vendor and support options are also more limited for proprietary systems.

Annenberg decided they wanted to explore open source to leverage the broader community and to be able to own their technology and manage it over time.

As John said, “We spent a lot of time researching… reading the websites for the open source projects… you get a heck of a lot of information sitting out there on the web about these things, way more than [for] any of the proprietary systems.”

Strategic Value of Open Source

John sees Annenberg’s decision to choose an open source content management system as an expression of their organization’s mission, as he told me:

“The mission of the Annenberg foundation is to advance the public well-being through improved communication… in my mind, open source software is an improvement in communication. In choosing this, we are setting an example [by saying] ‘Hey, this is the way to move forward if we are going to advance public well being through improved communication.’”

We have certainly seen a dramatic expansion in the popularity and adoption of open source technologies in the last decade, from the software that runs Wikipedia (Media Wiki) to Drupal and other content management and blogging platforms that all foster greater communication between people, organizations, the media, and government. Open source projects like Drupal also help to foster better communication among the contributors to the project. In the six years that I’ve been involved with Drupal I’ve seen Drupal related events grow by two orders of magnitude and bring together thousands of people from all over the world to share ideas and solve problems together. 

John said, “From a strategic perspective my long term goal is to begin integrating a bunch of open source systems to share data universally across all of the software that I’ve got here.” Drupal’s APIs, and rich contributed module ecosystem are fertile ground for integrating websites not only with other open source tools, but also those proprietary tools and services that offer APIs. While this is not a characteristic exclusive to open source software, it is certainly easier to make two applications talk to each other when you are free to view and modify the source code.

Why Drupal?

John and his team started by creating a list of potential open source content management systems. Through thorough research they winnowed the list down to just three: Wordpress, Joomla! and Drupal. These are widely considered to be the top three open source CMSs today (though some will debate whether Wordpress should be considered a CMS or a blogging platform.) Our research in December shows that they are indeed the top three choices of Foundations.

After further consideration, John knocked Wordpress off the list (because it is a system best suited for blogging and simple websites) and then compared Joomla! and Drupal head to head. As John said, “At the end of the day… I’d rather place my bet on the Drupal community… Drupal looked like it was more robust and more capable of handling the multisite requirement.” Drupal won in large part because of the developer community, but also due to its robust feature set and ability to handle multiple sites off of one code base, and for sites to talk to each other and share users.

“The question of Drupal vs Wordpress is very common. I looked at it by saying ‘Wordpress is a blogging platform. Its kernel is a blogging platform. Whereas Drupal’s kernel – in my understanding – is web content management.’ If you are going to have a complex site, I fundamentally don’t understand why you would use Wordpress over Drupal. I know that Wordpress could do it, but lots of things could do it. I want the best tool for the job, one that’s built from the ground up to do web content management – I don’t understand why you wouldn’t choose that.”

Click the link at the top to read the full article. 
(via @CiviCRM

Filed under Open source drupal-7 joomla Foundations wordpress Web nonprofit

0 notes &

This Highlighter Wordpress plugin looks interesting (watch the video for a demonstration). It is reminiscent in some ways to the New York Times’ “evolution of the hyperlink" in that users can pinpoint specific paragraphs or portions of text, but it has evolved slightly differently. Instead of simply allowing a link to a specific line, it allows commenting directly on that line, or sharing it on Twitter, Facebook or email with an easy dropdown menu.

It doesn’t look like it’s open source, but it’s free. Check it out at Highlighter.com.

It’s currently only for Wordpress, but I’d love to see versions for other CMS’ as well. Cough Drupal cough.

Filed under social media marketing wordpress nyt Web

1 note &

How To Create Your Own Custom WordPress Theme

Follow this overview of the build process to create your own custom WordPress theme. We’ll be taking my latest theme design from its basic HTML and CSS mockup and inserting the various WordPress template tags to build a fully working theme ready to install on your blog.

(by chrisspooner)

CEDC Note: If you don’t know how to do HTML or CSS on your own and the website you are working on is for a non-profit, we can help.

Filed under Wordpress theme html Css Web