Nonprofit web design tips and more from CEDC

Posts tagged Tumblr

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The Quick and Dirty Guide to Tumblr for [Nonprofits]

Likewise, this Mashable guide for small businesses works for nonprofits as well.

As with any other platform, there are pros and cons to consider. But with the popularity of Tumblr and the ease of setting up, customizing and maintaining your blog, we suggest you at least check it out — there’s a very engaged Tumblr audience waiting to see your content. Here are some tips to help you get started.

(via Class Acts Arts)

Filed under Tumblr guide tips Social tools social networks social media marketing

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A change in our Twitter handle…

Our nonprofit’s main Twitter account was just upgraded because Twitter was willing to release an inactive account that appeared to be simply squatting on our acronym — @cedc. In order to take advantage of that, we had to release the name we had been using back to public availability. Even though we’ve been trying to use custom subdomains to reference our Twitter account on printed materials, links from our site, and so on — so we can simply change where the subdomain points to without causing a major headache — we were a little apprehensive about just letting it go. We decided to pick that account name back up for our Tumblr stream’s Twitter account and dump the one we had been using for this purpose instead.

All that to say, our Tumblr stream now feeds into the @cedcoffice Twitter account. Follow us there and at our main account, @cedc.

Filed under Twitter subdomain Tumblr

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We’re soft launching our newly upgraded site and would love to get your feedback! In the next weeks we’re going to be going through to make sure we’ve squashed any bugs and then as part of the “official launch” we hope to:
post a more thorough blog entry describing the upgrades and listing some of the new features
add some of our more recent work to the portfolio
upgrade our Tumblr theme to match (yeah!)
So please, if you have a moment and an inclination, please visit the site and send us any feedback you’ve got! We also appreciate shares on social media or directly with folks who may be interested.

We’re soft launching our newly upgraded site and would love to get your feedback! In the next weeks we’re going to be going through to make sure we’ve squashed any bugs and then as part of the “official launch” we hope to:

  • post a more thorough blog entry describing the upgrades and listing some of the new features
  • add some of our more recent work to the portfolio
  • upgrade our Tumblr theme to match (yeah!)

So please, if you have a moment and an inclination, please visit the site and send us any feedback you’ve got! We also appreciate shares on social media or directly with folks who may be interested.

Filed under CEDC WEB feedback launch nonprofit webdesign tumblr

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Why attribution is important – even (especially) on Tumblr and Posterous

Not long ago, I saw a reference on Twitter to a clever illustration of either Wolverine or one Batman looking at another. I clicked through to a Tumblr page, where someone had reblogged it from someone else on Tumblr, who had reblogged it from someone else, and so on.

I wanted to send a quick note of appreciation to the artist, and have a look at some of her or his other work. But there was no credit to the person who created it. It was only after a dive into Google that I found the original artist: the brilliant Olly Moss. (Really – you have to see the illustration.) Others have also identified him, and credit is gradually rippling outward. (Interestingly, his blog is on Tumblr, too.)

But much of that huge initial viral wave passed him by — as it so often does on Tumblr, Posterous and their less-well-known short-form-blogging cousins. Those platforms are designed to make it quick and easy to share media… and even easier to reblog it.

Spend enough time on Tumblr, though, and you’ll notice something is often missing from the photos, cartoons, videos and Photoshopped gags that populate so many of its pages: attribution.

Filed under blog tumblr attribution reblog posterous

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A Question on Tumblr Etiquette

We’re still fairly new to Tumblr so I have a question on etiquette. Yesterday I posted something that I found interesting and which I thought would be interesting to nonprofits with an online presence (one of the primary audiences for this blog). I received a reply very quickly indicating (among other things) that this person wasn’t “a giant fan of reblogging”.

I realize that on the face of it, this is simply an expression of personal preference (which is fine), but it got me to wondering about the etiquette of reblogging in general and on Tumblr in particular. I’d love to hear any thoughts or feedback you may have.

First of all, my understanding of Tumblr.

It seems that Tumblr is, to some degree, a cross between Twitter and Delicious. At least that’s how I’ve been viewing it. It’s got it’s own social element (optionally integrated with Twitter to varying degrees), it seems to be primarily links and reblogs and richer media, and is more like a collection of things you’ve seen that you might like to look at again sometime. Most (although not all) of the meatier, original material is off-site on a “real” blog. So we are testing the waters on Tumblr as a way of collecting worthwhile and relevant links and sharing them with nonprofits (and anyone else) who are interested.

Then, my understanding of reblogging.

I understand there is a certain stigma to ‘reblogging’ thanks to unscrupulous content farms and site scrapers who take content wholesale and publish it as their own (although a version of the “Reblog” is a central feature of Tumblr, just as “Retweeting” is central to Twitter). Here are the rules that I’ve been developing as I go:

  • If you find the content on Tumblr, use the Tumblr ‘reblog’ to give credit to the original poster
  • If you find content off of Tumblr which you want to share on Tumblr, post an excerpt making sure to credit and link the original source
  • Occasionally if I find something off of Tumblr via Twitter I’ve also added the source I’ve found it through (although in the original example above, she asked that a link to her Tweet be removed from the listing)

In my mind, someone sharing an excerpt and a link to your content (which is off of Tumblr) is a win-win. If I’m missing something, please let me know, but here’s how I see it:

  • You get to share a link to the content that you find interesting or valuable
  • Your readers get to read an excerpt, decide if they are interested, and if so, click through
  • The original author gets inbound links to their site (and therefore increased site rank for various SEO factors) as well as increased traffic from those that have clicked through
  • If I remember who shared the link with me in the first place, they also get an acknowledgement for that (and possibly more Twitter followers out of the deal)

What do you think? Am I missing anything?

Filed under etiquette tumblr reblog attribution

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Creating a custom HTML theme for your Tumblr

Tumblr lets you fully customize the appearance of your blog by editing your theme’s HTML code. This is only recommended for users comfortable hand-coding HTML. If you’re not, there are hundreds of great themes to choose from in the Theme Garden!

We should also add, if you’re not (and the site you’re working on is for a non-profit), feel free to contact us. We may be able to help you.

Filed under Tumblr HTML theme theming